Food Allergy Living Blog




Page 1 of 87 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Will My Child Outgrow Their Cow Milk Allergy?

Posted 5.24.17 | Christine Graham-Garo


When children are diagnosed with milk allergies, parents might wonder, “Will my baby grow out of it?” As much as your new hypoallergenic formula and allergen-friendly diet is helping, you can’t help but wonder when you can feed your child without anxiety. Keep in mind, it’s normal to wonder!

Good news – Many children do outgrow their allergies; however, it may depend on what the child is allergic to and the type of allergy they have. Most importantly, keep in mind that all children are different!

Children with cow milk allergy (CMA) may be more likely to outgrow their allergies than their peanut or tree nut allergy buddies. One research study showed that 80% of kids diagnosed with a CMA will outgrow their allergy by 16 years of age[1]. More specifically, other research studies have found that about 45-50% of children outgrow CMA at one year, 60-75% at two years and 85-90% at three years.[2],[3]

Fortunately, the general consensus is that around 80% of children with cow milk allergy will outgrow it by 3-5 years of age[5]. Regular follow up by your medical specialist is important to re-test tolerance of cow milk protein.[6]

Now, compare that to the studies which show that about 20% and 10%, respectively, of young patients may outgrow peanut and tree nut allergies and approximately 8% of patients who outgrow a peanut allergy will later relapse, meaning the allergy comes back. Additionally, nut-related allergies are typically more severe and more likely to be fatal, which is quite scary![3]

For example, if your little one has multiple food allergies, such as both CMA and tree nut allergies, he or she may outgrow the CMA while the tree nut allergy could still persist. Still, outgrowing an allergy to cow milk will expand their diet and improve the quality of life and available foods for your little one.

Now this may be “good news/bad news” for some families. The good news is that the chance of the cow milk allergy being outgrown is very good, even if the child has the allergy into their teenage years, they are still likely to outgrow it. The bad news is that some infants with CMA may have it into their early teenage years, and a handful may never outgrow it.

The other factor that may influence your little one’s chances of outgrowing a food allergy is the levels of allergen-specific IgE detected in their blood. This means, the lower the allergen-specific IgE detected, the greater the chance of outgrowing the allergy. Your doctor can monitor this - make sure to ask them to explain the results, show you have the level has changed over time, and explain what the possible implications are.

As mentioned before, all children are different. Your little one may have all the right “ingredients” to overcome their cow milk allergy, but there is no way to know exactly when he or she will outgrow it. Your doctor may decide to attempt a food trial by introducing some foods that your child is allergic to, in order to see if the allergy still persists. Be patient, sometimes food trials can be taxing.

Our advice to allergy parents is not to worry, there is usually a light at the end of the tunnel! It’s wonderful if a child can outgrow their cow milk allergy, but if not, they can still thrive and lead happy, healthy lives.

To the more experienced food allergy parents, can you shed any advice on food trials and outgrowing allergies? Comment below or share your thoughts with us on our Facebook page!


[1] Skripack et al, J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007

[2] de Boissieu D, Dupont C. Time course of allergy to extensively hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins in infants. J Pediatr 2000;136:119-20.

[3] de Boissieu D, Dupont C. Allergy to extensively hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins in infants: safety and duration of amino acid-based formula. : J Pediatr. 2002;141:271-3.

[4] The natural history of peanut and tree nut allergy. Fleischer DM. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2007 Jun;7(3):175-81. Review.

[5] March 2016.  Cow’s milk (dairy) allergy, Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, [http://www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy/cows-milk-dairy-allergy] Viewed 6 May 2016

[6] Motala & Fiocchi, 2012, Cow’s milk allergy in children, World Allergy Organisation, [http://www.worldallergy.org/professional/allergic_diseases_center/cows_milk_allergy_in_children/] Viewed 15 May 2016


A Mother’s Tale: Learning About My Baby’s Milk Allergy

Posted 5.12.17 | Nutrition Specialist

When my oldest was born, we embarked on the journey of breastfeeding.  She took to it naturally, but the first week was painful and discouraging for me as a new mom. However, in time we fell into a comfortable and relaxing routine.    

At about six weeks of age my daughter began crying a lot. She was fussy, gassy, and unhappy. While I was nursing one morning, she projectile vomited. I called the doctor and they said it could have been too strong of a letdown and suggested that I relieve some of my milk prior to feeding.  I began researching like a mad woman. Phone in hand, determination in my soul. Something that was supposed to be natural couldn’t possibly be so difficult, right? Wrong.

That morning of purging began a weeklong stint of doctors visits, weight checks, days and nights of no sleep, and trying an over the counter formula that smelled no better than a cleaner or human waste.  My baby girl developed explosive diarrhea filled with blood and mucus.  It eventually came out in a neon green color and then transformed into a clear color, like water.  In one weeks time she had lost ounces of weight and lay lifeless. She had stopped crying. She had stopped fighting.  We now stopped listening to our doctor’s office and took her straight to the emergency room.

She was admitted and began treatment for a severe dairy allergy to the protein found in cow’s milk.  I gave up breastfeeding immediately and harbored the heartache and feelings of resentment deep down while I watched my perfect baby girl fight for her life.  The doctors informed us that had we not brought her in, she would have died at home.  Our gastroenterologist withheld all feeding for 24 hours to allow her body to begin healing.  At the completion of the 24 hours, we began a slow and steady feeding regimen. That was when we were introduced to Neocate.

My daughter’s feedings were small; a half ounce of Neocate every other hour to start.  She tolerated it amazingly.  No vomiting, no gas, no blood in her stools.  She graduated to every hour and before we knew it, she was taking an ounce every hour.  Throughout the week she began to gain weight and her vitals improved so well that she even gave us her first real smile.  In a week filled with horror, desperation, fear, and uncertainty, Neocate gave us some hope that we were going home with our daughter and that she would be pain-free. 

We went home after exactly one week.  With cans of Neocate in hand, we were more nervous leaving than when we brought her home as a newborn for the first time.  We followed a strict guideline from our doctor for feedings and had weekly checkups.  She gained weight and her stomach distress virtually disappeared.  Neocate was gentle and easy to use. To put it simply, Neocate saved my daughter’s life.  It wasn’t a band aid to temporarily get us by. It was just as essential to her as breathing. 

My daughter drank Neocate until she was a year and a half in age. The vitamins and nutrients were plentiful enough that our doctor wanted to give her body enough time to prepare for an introduction of the cow’s milk protein. It ended up that she had no intolerance to milk.  I saved the extra cans just in case. I felt a sense of security with them in the house despite the fact that she was doing great.

When my daughter turned two, I gave birth to our second little girl. I had gone dairy-free from the start and began the breastfeeding.  Everything was perfect, until she developed blood in her stool followed by diarrhea. Heartbroken, I called the doctor and at her discretion I opened the pantry door and pulled out a can of Neocate. Comforted by what felt like an old friend, we introduced Neocate and I began cutting out additional allergens from my diet. I tried nursing again, but had the same results.  It turns out that my children have an allergy to a protein found in my breastmilk.  My second daughter also became a Neocate baby. Neocate for me is the most natural and safe formula choice for babies with sensitive gastro systems or severe allergies. Neocate was made our choice due to circumstances, but in the end it has become our choice.  Neocate gave us happiness. It gave us life.

-        Melissa Stewart

Today’s guest blog post is by Melissa Stewart, a mother of two children with severe allergies. Melissa is the blogger behind One Cool Nerd Mommy. Check out her Facebook page, One Cool Nerd Mommy, for recipes, deals, and more!


Baby Rashes from A to Z (Acne to Eczema!) and When Is It a Milk Allergy?

Posted 4.18.17 | Nutrition Specialist

What new parent hasn’t asked questions like this: “Where did THAT come from?” Or maybe “Why is she suddenly so ITCHY?” Or even “What ARE all of those little bumps on her head?”

Babies drink what we give them (unless they don’t like it!), wear what we put on them (until they take it off!), and tend to stay where we put them (until they go mobile!). If adults are in control and a baby never leaves our sight, we should have answers to these questions. But almost every new parent comes up against a skin condition that they can’t explain.

As newborn babies grow and develop they can experience lots of different skin conditions. Some are typical, whereas others can be hard to explain. In today’s post, we’re going to walk through some of the most common questions and answers related to baby rashes. Food allergies can play a role in some of these conditions, so we’ll point out where that’s the case. 

Acne

Acne is something we associate with teenagers, but it can happen anytime in life. Acne is usually related to hormones, and babies sure do have hormones! Where do babies get hormones, maternal hormones are passed through the womb. Baby acne is harmless and usually goes away within a few weeks.

According to MayoClinic, “Baby acne can occur anywhere on the face, but usually appears on the cheeks, nose and forehead. Baby acne is common — and temporary. There's little you can do to prevent baby acne. Baby acne usually clears up on its own, without scarring.” Read more to learn when to see a doctor about baby acne

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis – which may also be called atopic eczema, involves scaly and itchy rashes that can be over a small or large part of the body. It can be triggered by allergens in the air (pollen, mold, dust mites, or animals), dry skin, or any number of factors. Severity of symptoms varies from one person to another. There’s an association between atopic dermatitis and food allergies, especially in cases of severe atopic dermatitis. At this time, it’s not clear if one causes the other. For infants, atopic dermatitis and cow milk allergy often are linked.

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis describes a situation where some substance makes contact with the skin and causes it to become red or inflamed. This could be anything from food to laundry detergent or lotions. Your little one’s healthcare team can help you narrow down the possibilities and make changes to remove whatever’s causing this type of dermatitis. If food is a cause, you’ll need to keep your little one from coming into contact with the food and cosmetics with ingredients from that food. Symptoms and treatments of contact dermatitis.

Diaper Rash

Diaper rash happens when a rash occurs on parts of the skin in contact with diapers. Some causes include having wet diapers on for too long, when the infant has diarrhea, or diapers are too tight. Rash can also be caused by introduction of new products to clean, for example if you are using cloth diapers. Symptoms and treatments of diaper rash.

Eczema

Eczema is a generic term for any dermatitis or skin swelling or itching. It’s often used to describe atopic dermatitis – see above! Read over a story of Morgan and his food allergy related eczema.

Hives

Hives, also called urticarial, are red, itchy bumps on the skin, often caused by an allergic reaction to a food or a drug. Hives can vary in size and can at times connect with one another to create a larger swelling. They often go away within 24 hours, but are still no fun. It’s important to avoid whatever substance or food triggers hives. Symptoms and treatments of hives.

Rash

A rash is a generic term that describes some sort of itchiness or irritation of the skin. Your doctor would be the best resource to look and narrow down what a rash represents and what might be causing it. For little onces, their pediatrician may decide to refer you to an allergist and/or a dermatologist.

When is a Rash a Milk Allergy?

Baby Rash

You should always refer to your pediatrician to help you understand what is causing your little one’s rash, but it’s also important to look at the big picture. Sometimes a baby with a cow milk allergy will also display other symptoms in addition to the rash. For instance, you may also see symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, gassiness, wheezing, runny nose, and/or colic.

If you do see a rash accompanied by any of these other symptoms, make sure to keep detailed notes and share all symptoms with your little one's doctor so that the healthcare team has all of the information to get to the bottom of what might be happening.

Also, make sure to work with your pediatrician to come up with a plan for taking care of your baby’s skin – no matter what is triggering the rash, it is important to take possible steps to alleviate the rash and any discomfort. Some possible steps your little one's doctor might suggest include:

  • Bathing your baby in soothing lukewarm water
  • Avoiding scented soaps, bath oils, and perfumed powders
  • Applying an over-the-counter moisturizer to your baby’s skin
  • Keeping your baby’s fingernails filed short and smooth to minimize damage from scratching
     
  • Using cotton mittens to help prevent scratching
  • Dressing your baby in soft cotton fabrics to prevent possible fabric irritation
  • Keeping your baby cool and avoiding hot, humid environments
  • Trying to keep your baby distracted from the itchiness with fun activities

We’ve told you what we know about various common skin conditions that you might see on your little one. Keep in mind, there are other conditions that can cause skin rashes, including various infections. Even with this info, you probably still have questions and want answers! The next step is to discuss them further with you little one’s healthcare team. Make sure you plan ahead, take notes and ask the right questions when you see your doctor.

-Rob

Rob McCandlish is a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who joined the Nutricia team in 2010. Rob has years of experience at Nutricia following food allergy research, working with Neocate products, talking with Neocate families and learning about the science behind Neocate and food allergies. Rob has two nephews who both used Neocate for their cow milk allergies!


Allergy-Friendly Ideas for Easter Baskets

Posted 4.14.17 | Nutrition Specialist

Easter is days away and if this is a holiday you celebrate, we want to ensure you have plenty of allergy-friendly holiday ideas! When dealing with food allergies, the Easter bunny has to be especially careful to bring safe, fun treats.

With a bit of creativity, it’s possible to have an exciting holiday for all to enjoy. Here are several ideas for how you can fill an allergy-friendly Easter basket for your little one. Several of these treats can even be done as a fun Easter crafts.

Milk-Free and Egg-Free Treats

If you do decide to include candy in your Easter baskets, we recommend referring to Kids With Food Allergies’updated list of allergy-safe candies.

Just because your little one has dietary restrictions, doesn’t mean they can’t indulge!

Allergen-Free Cupcakes

Gluten-free, allergen-free AND vegan cupcake recipe from cookbook author, mom and food-allergic person, Cybele Pascal.

Egg-Free Decorating

Traditions are part of what make holidays so exciting, and we know how much kids can enjoy arts and crafts. If you live in an egg-free home, there are alternatives for egg decorating that you can explore to make sure that your children have the full “holiday experience.”

Several families use plastic Easter eggs for decoration, while others may defer to ceramic options. With these faux-egg choices, you can ensure that your children get to safely enjoy the little traditions, without feeling left out.

Easter Crafts

Another fun way to have the whole family involved in Easter activities is to encourage craft making! By keeping little ones busy with some of these artsy options, you can establish new customs for your family to follow each year.

If you’re interested in a chick-themed Easter, you can craft hatching chicks with some egg cartons, or reuse wine corks to make chick designs on paper!

Paper Bunny

For many children, the Easter Bunny is the most popular figure of the holiday. Why not create your own Easter bunny with kids using a bit of paper and  glue? Check out this super adorable craft idea from Andreja from Easy Peasy and Fun.

http://www.easypeasyandfun.com/easy-paper-bunny-craft/

Funny Bunnies

How adorable are these little guys!? We can’t stand the cuteness. If you have a bit more time this weekend and are looking for ways to use a brand new cutter/stamper, this might be the perfect project for you.

Easy Bunny Treat Cups

Don’t have a lot of free time for a craft project but still want to do something? Check this fun cup decorating idea from Keri. It’s sure to make any snack ready for your festivities.

Bunny Mask

It wouldn’t be Easter without a cute bunny! Create an easy bunny mask that the kids will love to make and play with.

Easter Chick Craft

A fun handprint craft idea from a stay-at-home mom that your whole family will enjoy. You can even give these out as a party gift!

Easter Mason Jars

What kind of list would this be if we didn’t include at least one Mason jar project?! 

For more fun Easter basket ideas, check out our Neocate Pinterest page. We have an entire board dedicated to Spring/Easter where you will find more crafts and allergy-friendly recipes.

BONUS!

If you are looking for a fun allergy-friendly activity you can do this weekend, check out 6 Allergy-Friendly Easter Egg Hunt ideas.

Regardless of your preferences, there are plenty of options for crafts for families to enjoy. We would love to see what you and your family come up with. Don't forget to share your holiday traditions with us on our Facebook page

 


New Neocate Footsteps Recipe Book For Easy Allergen-Free Cooking

Posted 4.11.17 | Nutrition Specialist

Who loves new food allergy-friendly recipes? This is why we are excited to announce the release of the Neocate Footsteps Recipe Book! In this recipe book, we have included some of our popular recipes as well as brand new ones developed having you in mind. We hope that this book will be a valuable resource for families of children with food allergies and help make mealtime a little bit easier for everyone. As a reminder, please check each recipe to be sure all ingredients are safe for your child and if you have any questions or concerns please consult your physician.

Download New Footsteps Recipe Book

Want to get a sneak peak, before downloading the recipe book? Here is one of our favorite recipes:

Meatballs in Tomato Sauce 

Neocate Junior, unflavored is used in preparation of this recipe. Adding Neocate to food is easy, fast and safe. It can also help you or your child to tolerate other foods better. When cooking with Neocate, be sure to let very hot foods cool down a little before adding Neocate and not to reheat dishes prepared with Neocate.

What you need:

  • ⅓ cup ground beef
  • 2 Tbsp preferred bread crumbs
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped onion
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced
  • Pinch Italian seasoning
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tsp tomato purée or tomato ketchup
  • 1 scoop Neocate Junior, Unflavored

Directions:

  • Make the meatballs by combining the first five ingredients in a bowl or food processor.
  • Divide into six small, even pieces. Squeeze each tightly and roll into small balls.
  • Heat the oil in a wide pan. Fry the balls until browned. Remove meatballs to a plate.
  • Sautée the onion in the same pan until soft.
  • Add the garlic, tomatoes and purée/paste.
  • Stir thoroughly. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Stir in the Neocate Junior until thoroughly mixed.
  • Serve with the meatballs.

If you've tried any of these recipes, let us know what you think?  And if you have any creative recipes that help you incorporate Neocate, we love to hear from you as well.


New Dairy-Free Recipe - Sweet Potato & Chicken Casserole

Posted 4.4.17 | Nutrition Specialist

When you or a loved one is on a severely restricted diet due to food allergies or related conditions, the diet can become very boring, very fast. Multiple flavors of Neocate helps in making meal time more fun and enjoyable. But even those can be routine sometimes. This is why we are excited to announce the release of new recipes this spring… Here is the first recipe for you to try and enjoy!

Sweet Potato & Chicken Casserole

Neocate Junior, unflavored is used in preparation of this recipe. Adding Neocate to food is easy, fast and safe. It can also help you or your child to tolerate other foods better. When cooking with Neocate, be sure to let very hot foods cool down a little before adding Neocate and not to reheat dishes prepared with Neocate.

What you need:

  • 1 small sweet potato, peeled and chopped
  • ⅓ cup ground chicken
  • 3 Tbsp finely chopped or grated onion
  • ¼ cup finely chopped or grated carrot
  • 1 small mushroom, finely chopped
  • 2 fl oz low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp dairy-free spread
  • 2 Tbsp preferred bread crumbs
  • 2 scoops Neocate Junior, Unflavored

Directions:

  • Place sweet potato in small saucepan with water to cover, bring to a boil. Simmer until soft.
  • Meanwhile, heat the oil and brown the chicken, stirring occasionally and breaking apart.
  • Add the onions, carrots and mushrooms and cook for 5-10 minutes, until the vegetables are softened and starting to brown.
  • Add the stock and bring to a simmer for 2-3 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat. Cool slightly and stir in one scoop of Neocate Junior.
  • Pour the water off to drain the sweet potato in the saucepan.
  • Add the dairy-free spread and mash until smooth with a masher or fork.
  • Stir in the remaining scoop of Neocate Junior to the sweet potato.
  • Spoon the chicken mixture into a small ovenproof dish. Top with the mashed sweet potato.
  • Sprinkle with breadcrumbs and brown under the broiler.

But wait, there's more!

You might ask how soon you can access more recipes. Well, we’ve got you covered. We have just added 6 more new recipes to our Neocate Footsteps app.

Download the app today (available on iTunes Only)

Bon Appétit!


What does Hypoallergenic Mean?

Posted 3.30.17 | Nutrition Specialist

Most consumers today believe that a product labeled as hypoallergenic will not cause an allergic reaction, but is this really true?

Let’s start with the basics. The technical definition of “hypoallergenic” is that a product is less likely to cause an allergic reaction, or will cause fewer allergic reactions. There are few federal standards that regulate the use of this term for consumer goods. For many products, like cosmetics, the term “hypoallergenic” may be used without ANY evidence or support. Some companies will use certain tests for a product to support that it’s hypoallergenic.

For infant formulas, however, you can rest assured that the term “hypoallergenic” can ONLY be used when certain criteria are met.

What is a Hypoallergenic Infant Formula?

When it comes to infant formulas, based on calls our nutrition specialists receive on a regular basis, many people think the term hypoallergenic means the product is totally void of any and all things that could trigger an allergic reaction. The reality is a bit more complex.

For an infant formula to claim hypoallergenicity it needs to go through study in a clinical trial. The requirements have been based on recommendations by the According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). According to the AAP, a hypoallergenic infant formula must:

  • Be studied in a clinical trial
  • Be studied in patients with documented cow milk allergy
  • Have been shown to be tolerated by at least 90% of the patients

“Tolerated” means that the formula did not cause an allergic reaction, or that those with cow milk allergy did not have defined symptoms, such as hives, anaphylaxis, or other symptoms of a food allergy.  Only infant formulas made with free amino acids – like Neocate – or extensively hydrolyzed protein, also called peptides, have met the necessary criteria in these studies and can be classified as hypoallergenic. 

Other infant formulas are NOT hypoallergenic. These include formulas made with whole dairy protein, formulas made with soy protein, and formulas made with partially hydrolyzed protein. (Hydrolyzed protein comes from dairy protein, but partially hydrolyzed protein is not broken down as much as extensively hydrolyzed protein.)

Difference Between a Hydrolyzed Formula and Amino Acid-Based Formula

Hydrolyzed formulas are made using protein from dairy, but the milk proteins in those formulas have been broken down into smaller fragments. The body’s immune system may not detect the smaller protein fragments as being an allergen. In some patients with a cow milk allergy, the body still reacts to the protein fragments in extensively hydrolyzed formula, resulting in allergic reactions.

Amino acid-based formulas, which used to be called elemental formulas, use only amino acids as the source of protein. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, and are too small for the body to recognize as being foreign. They are the least allergenic form of protein.

To help you visualize the difference between these two types of formulas, picture a pearl necklace. In this example our necklace represents the strand of amino acids that make a protein.  If you take the necklace and break it into smaller length strands where several pearls are connected, this would look like the peptides used in partially-hydrolyzed formulas. Even shorter strands of a few pearls will look like the smaller peptides used in an extensively hydrolyzed formula.

If you start with individual pearls, then you have a visual example of an amino acid-based formula. In an amino acid-based formula like Neocate, none of the amino acids are attached to each other. In Neocate, the amino acids are NOT derived from dairy protein. The amino acids in Neocate are synthetic, meaning they’re not derived from meat. Most of them are made from plant sugars, and some are completely synthetic.

Here’s another way to look at infant formulas and their potential for triggering an allergic reaction:

Can a Child React to a Hypoallergenic Infant Formula?

It is possible for a child with food allergies react to formulas made with hydrolyzed protein, or peptides. Amino acid-based formulas, on the other hand, are the least allergenic type of formula, meaning they’re least likely to cause a food allergy reaction.

While two types of infant formulas can claim to be hypoallergenic, based on the information above you can see that the term alone doesn’t guarantee that there will NOT be an allergic reaction. It’s important to look at your child’s individual case and discuss with your healthcare professional the type of hypoallergenic formula – amino acid-based or extensively hydrolyzed - that would best fit your needs.

Here are some additional resources that can be helpful if you are currently evaluating various formula types


How can finding “flavor fit” make a difference in elemental diet?

Posted 3.23.17 | Nutrition Specialist


Do you have a favorite song? You know the one that makes your day if you hear it on the radio. Now think, what about that particular song that makes it your favorite? Is it the lyrics, the beat, the emotion it evokes, or all the above?

Just like your taste in music is unique to your experiences and how you interpret the world, flavor preferences follow suit. When it comes to flavors, the one you decide to be your favorite depends on a variety of factors unique to you.

When you or a loved one is on a severely restricted diet due to food allergies or related conditions, limited options in the diet can make finding a favorite flavor a bit difficult. At Nutricia, we are constantly working to help you explore new ways to make meal time interesting and provide access to ways you can experience new flavors. Our family of products provides more inviting flavor and texture options than anyone else. We talk to families and parents every day for whom Neocate is the sole or primary source of nutrition for a loved one, and for many of them the flavor and form options offered by Neocate has made a difference!

Here’s why having options to find your “flavor fit” is important:

Taste is personal and unique to every person

Taste preferences are strongly influenced by innate factors and can be changed by experience. Natural preferences for various flavors change developmentally as infants and children grow. The preferences for specific flavors are determined by innate/inborn factors, environmental influences, learnings, and a combination of these factors; making each individual unique.  

Flavor Options Help Influence Preferences

Experiences and exposure to various flavors and textures help to shape preferences as children grow, and we at Nutricia are striving to offer opportunities for those on elemental, or amino acid-based, diets gain such experiences. Did you know Neocate is the only amino acid-based formula available with 10 options to choose from for individuals one year and older?

Be Curious: Explore and find your flavor fit

Moms, dads and other caregivers know that keeping kids on the special diets that require Neocate isn't always easy, especially as they grow and see other children enjoying more variety at the dinner table. When it comes to an elimination diet, having more than one flavor option lessens the “boredom effect” that may happen when only a single flavor is used long term. No matter how long you or your child needs an amino acid-based formula for nutritional support, Neocate offers the greatest flavor variety.

Just like their favorite song, your loved ones have the option to pick a favorite flavor with Neocate.   

Here’s a rundown of the available Neocate flavor options:

We want you to be able to find one that works best for you and your child! In some cases, you may be able to use a few flavors to help with variety. Some parents have even told us they were able to find their child’s favorite flavor by combining Neocate Junior flavors to make delicious Vanilla and Strawberry drinks.

Additional helpful resources if you are considering trying Neocate flavors:


Around The World in 60 Days Challenge - Help us help Children’s Medical Nutrition Alliance

Posted 3.15.17 | Nutrition Specialist

There are thousands of children in the United States with allergic or rare metabolic conditions that struggle every day because they are unable to eat the same foods as everyone else. We are asking you to sponsor an organization that helps these children get the specialized medical nutrition that they need in order to grow and develop.

Inadequate & Uneven Coverage is Just One Of the Many Barriers to Medical Foods Access

As you may know, specialized medical nutrition, like Neocate, is recommended and prescribed by pediatric doctors as an important part of managing early childhood disease. However, often times the important products that families need are not entirely covered by insurances. The families of these children face many worries and an enormous burden trying to ensure their children can eat without pain and develop normally.

This is where Children’s Medical Nutrition Alliance (CMNuA) comes in. CMNuA is a 501[c]3 non-profit organization that supports families in covering a major part of their expenses with medical nutrition in those cases where the child’s insurance is unable to help. The money they use to help these families comes from financial donations and fundraising events.

CMNuA empowers, educates, assists, advocates for and supports ALL patients who require medical nutrition. In doing so, CMNuA has created the first-ever national coalition dedicated to enhancing the lives of all patients in need of medical nutrition regardless of their underlying condition.

 

 

Around The World in 60 Days Challenge

At Nutricia, the makers of Neocate, we understand the struggles these families go through and how necessary CMNuA is for them. That is why this year we have challenged ourselves to virtually Walk Around the World in 60 days (#ATW60D) in support of CMNuA. The challenge will require our team to collectively walk 25,000 miles in 60 days. Nutricia North America will donate $10,000 to CMNuA if the goal is met! Our challenge starts March 15th and will continue until May 10th 2017.

The virtual walk will be divided into 4 phases. We will track our progress via fitness trackers and will report on them over the coming weeks:

Will You Join Us?

Help CMNuA by sponsoring the challenge! Join us in supporting these families with a gift to CMNuA and have your donation doubled by Nutricia. Every dollar counts for this incredible non-profit organization. Nutricia North America pledges to match external donations up to $3,000.

Donate Today!

Thank you for your consideration and for helping the children supported by CMNuA. Stay tuned as we will be updating our progress on #ATW60D over the next 60 days!

Week 2 Update (March 15 - March 29)

Oi! Bem-vindo a São Paulo, Brasil! Hi! Welcome to São Paulo, Brazil! We have now walked a total of 16.874.240 steps since we started.With the successful completion of phase 1 we have also unlocked the first $2.500 donation to CMNuA from Nutricia! On top of that we have continued to see donations come in from other sources, which is great! Thank you all for sharing the word! 

Week 3 Update (March 29 - April 4)

 
Bonjour! We have entered phase 2 of our virtual walk around the world. We are currently in France, soon to be walking through The Netherlands – over halfway to our phase two destination, Moscow! We have walked a total of 25,685,996 steps and completed 38% of our virtual journey. Some fun facts:
  • This week we have taken over 8.8 million steps
  • On average our team is walking 9.6 thousand steps per day per stepper
  • Countries we've walked through on the way: Senegal, Maurita, Algeria and Spain

Don't foget to keep spreading the word and helping our team to raise funds!  Donate Today!


Celebrating Motherhood on International Women’s Day 2017: #BeBoldForChange

Posted 3.8.17 | Nutrition Specialist

In 1977, the United Nations officially proclaimed March 8 International Women’s Day. Although observances celebrating women are not new, the designation of this day marked a global shift in recognition of women’s contributions to our world. Today, we join in celebration of women all over the world and ask you to join us to be #BeBoldForChange.

 

This year’s #BeBoldForChange campaign calls on individuals to help forge a better working world; a more inclusive, gender-equal world. In 2016, leaders around the world pledged to take actions as champions of gender parity. This year’s campaign encourages women everywhere to join these world leaders to serve as change agents in their communities.  

 

So what does being bold for change really mean? Many parents in the food allergy community are well aware of what being a bold advocate entails. Many of us act as our own advocates! Being a parent means that we create change by setting examples for our children.  For International Women’s Day, start the conversation in your home about gender equality.

 

While we continue to consider how we can be bold in 2017, we honor incredible mothers who continue to empower women around the world by sharing a few of their quotes:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Learn more about how you can #BeBoldForChange by visiting the official website for International Women’s Day 2017.


Page 1 of 87 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›


About Us

Food Allergy Living is a resource for parents of children with food allergies, brought to you by Nutricia, the makers of Neocate. For more in-depth information about our purpose & authors, see our About Food Allergy Living page.