Food Allergies and Cross-Reactivity – Do You Have to Avoid Related Foods?


Posted 6.8.17 | Nutrition Specialist

 

Learning that you or your loved one has an allergy to a food often sparks a long list of questions.  One common question that many families have is “If my child is allergic to one item, what else are they allergic to?”  Another common question is “Where should I start when either trying new food items or adding foods back into my diet?” If you are facing these questions, you are not alone!!  Each of us is unique and there is no substitute for individualized guidance and recommendations from your healthcare team. Let’s take a look at something called Cross-Reactivity to help you get the conversation started with your healthcare team if you are facing these questions.

Finding the Food Allergy?

An allergy to food is typically an allergic reaction, or overreaction by your immune system to the protein piece of the food.  For example, children often have a milk allergy which more specifically is a cow milk protein allergy. Proteins found in one food item can also be similar to the proteins in other or related foods, and sometimes your body cannot tell the difference. The question becomes if you are allergic to one food item, will you also be allergic to the protein in a related food. This concept is called “Cross-Reactivity”.  But what does this mean for you?

Food allergies can involve many types of responses; you may get a rash when eating a certain food or it could be life threatening, like anaphylaxis.  The most common immune response to a food allergy is when your body makes something called IgE antibodies to the protein of the food allergen.  You see this in a variety of physical reactions or symptoms such as skin itching, hives, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, breathing difficulty such as wheezing or coughing, or the life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis. 

As you likely well know, diagnosis of food allergies is not an easy process.  Experts at the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute in New York recommend that diagnosis of food allergies include careful interpretation of a variety of factors including physical examination, skin test or RASTs, detailed patient history, and oral food challenges or elimination diets. This extensive testing and the possible conflicting results are just one of many reasons why individualized treatment and recommendations are needed, and why there is no substitute for the individual guidance you will receive from your healthcare team.

What is Cross-Reactivity?

So where should you start when either trying new foods or adding foods back into your diet? To help allergist identify related foods of concern, research was conducted into how likely people with a given food allergy are to react to other related foods. Family allergists may use this data to help determine what advice to give their patients about where to start when either trying new foods or adding food items back into your diet. If you want to read the review of the clinical data, the full reference is noted below.

In some cases, the data reveals a significant chance of having an allergic reaction (or at least a positive allergy test) to a new food when the protein is related. For example, if you are allergic to cashews, you may also be allergic to pistachios and/or mango.1 There are many families of foods that may be linked, so it is best to consult with your healthcare provider to determine the extent of your food allergy and the potential for cross-reactivity. As noted above, your healthcare team will offer guidance for you specifically after all the information has been collected and evaluated. 

How to Spot Foods That Might Cause Cross-Reactivity?

The table below shows some of the potential cross-reactivity revealed by this research review, and was developed by an allergist at the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Clinicians might use a table like this when determining where you might start when either trying new foods or adding food items back into your diet.

A clinician would look for your known food allergen in the left column. The column on the right gives an indication of the risk that there will be an allergic reaction to one of the foods that are listed in the center column. For example, for a patient allergic to cow milk, the available research shows there is a 92% chance the patient will have an allergic reaction (or a positive allergy test) to goat milk, but only a 4% chance of an allergic reaction to mare (horse) milk and a 10% chance of an allergic reaction to beef and beef products.

As always, follow the guidance and recommendations from your healthcare team.

What is the best way to introduce new foods to the diet?

Once your healthcare team has a plan for you, the next step is trying the food items suggested.  Again, your healthcare team will likely have a very specific plan for you.  They may suggest that you try foods at home, starting with a small amount and then wait a few days before trying the food item again or even moving on to the next food item.  If you have had sever food reactions in the past, then they may only recommend new foods be tried as an oral food challenge. This should only be done under strict medical supervision (e.g. in a doctor’s office) and involves trials with small amounts of the food causing the allergy or a potential cross-reactive food.  Depending on your results, the healthcare team will guide as you continue to explore and try new food items.  

Oringally published  12/22/15 by Ellen Avery, MS, RD, CNSC2.

Updated 6/8/17 by Kristin Crosby MS, RDN, LDN

References

Sicherer SH. Clinical implications of cross-reactive food allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001;108(6):881-90.

 

 

 

Read Comments (3)

  • 2017-06-22 | Crystie

    I just wanted to come back and post a positive story. My sons only nutrition was Neocate for the first 2 years of his life. He was allergic to every single thing I tried to feed him. I would lay awake at night in a panic. I was SO grateful for Neocate but how will my child survive without food???  At 2 he finally started to be able to eat fruit (not pre cut - preservatives were a big issue) then meat, then bread, etc. He is now 6 years old and his only food allergy is peanuts. If you’re at the beginning of this road please keep hope. There is hope.

  • 2017-06-22 | Tina

    My grandaughter went through 4-5 formulas, the last being Neocate, and was put on 3 meds for vomiting diagnosed as multiple protein allergy. I added goat’s milk to her diet. Vomiting was almost gone within 1 week. Discontinued meds and she continued to improve.

  • 2017-06-24 | Nutrition Specialist

    Crystie and Tina, thank you both so much for your comments! We’re sure that there are many other families with stories similar to yours who will be happy to read these and know they’re not alone.
    -Rob

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Food Allergy Living is a resource for parents of children with food allergies, brought to you by Nutricia, the makers of Neocate. For more in-depth information about our purpose & authors, see our About Food Allergy Living page.