Food Allergy Living Blog Tagged Results


baby rash

R.J.’s Story – An Update

Posted 3.29.11 | Nutrition Specialist

We've shared R.J.'s story before (and his little brother Ken). As a child he had severe,painful eczema that covered his entire body. His parents tried everything, but he didn't find relief until they switched to Neocate.

We wanted to share this sweet video that his parents sent to us recently. Today R.J. is 5 years old, and doing great! He is still allergic to milk, but Neocate has helped make him a happy and health little boy.

R.J. Happy & Health Video

-Sarah


But Doctor, Is My Baby’s Rash Really JUST a Rash?

Posted 1.18.11 | Rob McCandlish, RDN

Here at Neocate, we often talk with concerned parents who tell us they’ve read other stories from parents whose children had a terrible rash that was only helped by Neocate after lots of trial and error. Frequently, these parents tell us they don’t feel their doctor is familiar with food allergies. Just yesterday a father told me that his pediatrician kept telling him that “every baby gets rashes, it’s normal; he’ll grow out of it.”

Some pediatricians and many parents are surprised to learn that about seven percent of children have food allergies. Many parents who eventually learn that their child has a food allergy, which can only be treated by changing the diet, wish their journey to a solution had been shorter and simpler. Here are some tips for what you can do if you feel your doctor isn’t recognizing your little one’s rash as a possible sign of a food allergy.

Take Careful Notes

A rash is often the first sign of a food allergy that a parent notices. While it’s true that almost all babies experience diaper rash at some point, this is not the same as a rash caused by food allergy. Diaper rash, like many rashes, is caused by something on the outside: wet or rubbing diapers, scented lotion, rough fabrics, or even fabric softener. It’s important to rule out these other causes that might contribute to eczema, atopic dermatitis, or itching.

If you’ve eliminated potential causes, it’s more likely that the rash is caused by something on the inside: a food allergen. If you document all steps you’ve taken to eliminate other culprits, the doctor is more likely to consider a food allergy as the cause of your baby’s rash. If you notice that your baby has a rash and you think it might be related to a food allergy, check to see if your baby exhibits any other signs of a food allergy. It’s unusual for a baby with food allergy to only have a rash. Make a list of your baby’s symptoms which could also be caused by a food allergy to provide to the doctor.

Many parents tell us that they went through multiple different infant formulas before finally finding relief with Neocate. Some infants don’t even tolerate breast milk because of dairy foods in the mom’s diet. Make notes of the different symptoms that did not go away with each formula you’ve tried. Many doctors assume a soy formula or hydrolyzed formula will help if the baby has a milk allergy. However, many babies with a milk allergy also have a soy allergy and can be extremely sensitive to even small amounts of milk protein.

Make an Appointment with Your Baby’s Doctor

When you discuss your baby’s rash with the pediatrician, explain that you think you have ruled out other causes, and explain the list of changes you tried that did not help. Inform the doctor that food allergy is common among infants, and explain the other symptoms your child is experiencing which could be related to food allergy. Skin creams are commonly prescribed for rashes. While these creams may help to reduce inflammation and itching caused by a food allergy, they will not help other allergy symptoms such as diarrhea, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or wheezing. Only a change in the diet will truly solve the problem.

When you see your pediatrician, you may also want to request a referral to an allergist (narrow your search by selecting the “Food Allergy” specialty). The allergy testing that these professionals perform provides the best information to help your child find a diagnosis and relief from a food allergy.

Finally, share with the doctor your knowledge of Neocate, the amino acid-based formula that makes such a difference for babies with food allergies. It’s important to follow the steps to help give your baby’s rash the best chance to heal. We know that it is so hard to see your little one feeling so uncomfortable but remember it may take some time, even after you start using Neocate.

What steps did you take to know that your baby’s rash was caused by food allergy?

- Rob

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Top Ten Blog Posts of 2010

Posted 1.4.11 | Sarah O'Brien

Happy New Year! Before we jump into 2011 on Food Allergy Living, we wanted to recap our top ten blog posts of 2010. We tackled topics from food allergy recipes to tube feeding and everything in between and had some excellent guest bloggers share their stories. Based on reader traffic, here were our most popular posts:

1) Baby Rashes (when is it a milk allergy?)

In this post, Christine talks about how to tell if your child has a typical rash or if it is a sign of an allergic reaction to cow’s milk.

2) Dysphagia, GERD and Silent Aspiration

Mallory tackled the topic of GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, and two other conditions commonly associated with it: dysphagia and silent aspiration.

3) Accidental Injections of Epinephrine from an EpiPen

If you or your child uses an EpiPen, this blog is a must-read in case you ever have an accidental injection.

4) Fun Summer Camps for Kids with Food Allergies

Children with food allergies don’t have to miss out on summer camp fun with these allergy-friendly options.

5) How Can Duocal Help My Child Gain Weight?

If your child is underweight or has been diagnosed with failure to thrive, the supplement Duocal can help provide extra calories in their diet.

6) Baby Formula and Food Thickeners: What are the Options?

Thickeners can help treat reflux, but children with food allergies often react to the rice cereals or oatmeals that are commonly recommended. Christine offers some other options that are allergy-friendly.

7) Guest Blog: Living with Eosinophilic Esophagitis - Norman’s Story

Kendra Tiedemann shared her son Norman’s journey with eosinophilic esophagitis.

8) Understanding How Infant Taste Buds Work

If you’ve ever wondered if your baby can taste her food, then be sure to read this post from Mallory.

9) Failure to Thrive: My Child is Underweight, What Should I Do?

In this post, Nita helped to clear up some common confusions about what a failure to thrive diagnosis means and how it is treated.

10) Guest Blog: Food Protein-Induced Entercolitis Syndrome – Roland’s Story

Lorelei Alvarez, one of the founders of the Reflux Rebels group, shared her son Roland’s journey with FPIES in this guest blog.

Which blog posts were your favorite over the last year? Are there any topics you’d like to see us cover in 2011?

- Sarah


Baby Rashes from A to Z (Acne to Eczema!) and When Is It a Milk Allergy?

Posted 4.18.17 | Nutrition Specialist

What new parent hasn’t asked questions like this: “Where did THAT come from?” Or maybe “Why is she suddenly so ITCHY?” Or even “What ARE all of those little bumps on her head?”

Babies drink what we give them (unless they don’t like it!), wear what we put on them (until they take it off!), and tend to stay where we put them (until they go mobile!). If adults are in control and a baby never leaves our sight, we should have answers to these questions. But almost every new parent comes up against a skin condition that they can’t explain.

As newborn babies grow and develop they can experience lots of different skin conditions. Some are typical, whereas others can be hard to explain. In today’s post, we’re going to walk through some of the most common questions and answers related to baby rashes. Food allergies can play a role in some of these conditions, so we’ll point out where that’s the case. 

Acne

Acne is something we associate with teenagers, but it can happen anytime in life. Acne is usually related to hormones, and babies sure do have hormones! Where do babies get hormones, maternal hormones are passed through the womb. Baby acne is harmless and usually goes away within a few weeks.

According to MayoClinic, “Baby acne can occur anywhere on the face, but usually appears on the cheeks, nose and forehead. Baby acne is common — and temporary. There's little you can do to prevent baby acne. Baby acne usually clears up on its own, without scarring.” Read more to learn when to see a doctor about baby acne

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis – which may also be called atopic eczema, involves scaly and itchy rashes that can be over a small or large part of the body. It can be triggered by allergens in the air (pollen, mold, dust mites, or animals), dry skin, or any number of factors. Severity of symptoms varies from one person to another. There’s an association between atopic dermatitis and food allergies, especially in cases of severe atopic dermatitis. At this time, it’s not clear if one causes the other. For infants, atopic dermatitis and cow milk allergy often are linked.

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis describes a situation where some substance makes contact with the skin and causes it to become red or inflamed. This could be anything from food to laundry detergent or lotions. Your little one’s healthcare team can help you narrow down the possibilities and make changes to remove whatever’s causing this type of dermatitis. If food is a cause, you’ll need to keep your little one from coming into contact with the food and cosmetics with ingredients from that food. Symptoms and treatments of contact dermatitis.

Diaper Rash

Diaper rash happens when a rash occurs on parts of the skin in contact with diapers. Some causes include having wet diapers on for too long, when the infant has diarrhea, or diapers are too tight. Rash can also be caused by introduction of new products to clean, for example if you are using cloth diapers. Symptoms and treatments of diaper rash.

Eczema

Eczema is a generic term for any dermatitis or skin swelling or itching. It’s often used to describe atopic dermatitis – see above! Read over a story of Morgan and his food allergy related eczema.

Hives

Hives, also called urticarial, are red, itchy bumps on the skin, often caused by an allergic reaction to a food or a drug. Hives can vary in size and can at times connect with one another to create a larger swelling. They often go away within 24 hours, but are still no fun. It’s important to avoid whatever substance or food triggers hives. Symptoms and treatments of hives.

Rash

A rash is a generic term that describes some sort of itchiness or irritation of the skin. Your doctor would be the best resource to look and narrow down what a rash represents and what might be causing it. For little onces, their pediatrician may decide to refer you to an allergist and/or a dermatologist.

When is a Rash a Milk Allergy?

Baby Rash

You should always refer to your pediatrician to help you understand what is causing your little one’s rash, but it’s also important to look at the big picture. Sometimes a baby with a cow milk allergy will also display other symptoms in addition to the rash. For instance, you may also see symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, gassiness, wheezing, runny nose, and/or colic.

If you do see a rash accompanied by any of these other symptoms, make sure to keep detailed notes and share all symptoms with your little one's doctor so that the healthcare team has all of the information to get to the bottom of what might be happening.

Also, make sure to work with your pediatrician to come up with a plan for taking care of your baby’s skin – no matter what is triggering the rash, it is important to take possible steps to alleviate the rash and any discomfort. Some possible steps your little one's doctor might suggest include:

  • Bathing your baby in soothing lukewarm water
  • Avoiding scented soaps, bath oils, and perfumed powders
  • Applying an over-the-counter moisturizer to your baby’s skin
  • Keeping your baby’s fingernails filed short and smooth to minimize damage from scratching
     
  • Using cotton mittens to help prevent scratching
  • Dressing your baby in soft cotton fabrics to prevent possible fabric irritation
  • Keeping your baby cool and avoiding hot, humid environments
  • Trying to keep your baby distracted from the itchiness with fun activities

We’ve told you what we know about various common skin conditions that you might see on your little one. Keep in mind, there are other conditions that can cause skin rashes, including various infections. Even with this info, you probably still have questions and want answers! The next step is to discuss them further with you little one’s healthcare team. Make sure you plan ahead, take notes and ask the right questions when you see your doctor.

-Rob

Rob McCandlish is a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who joined the Nutricia team in 2010. Rob has years of experience at Nutricia following food allergy research, working with Neocate products, talking with Neocate families and learning about the science behind Neocate and food allergies. Rob has two nephews who both used Neocate for their cow milk allergies!


A Mom’s Journey with TED (Total Elimination Diet)

Posted 6.7.11 | Nutrition Specialist

Our post today is a guest blog entry from Rachel Miller, Baby E’s mom. We’d like to thank Rachel for guest blogging for us.

Never could I have imagined that adding another bouncing baby boy to our family last summer would not only add extra snuggles and smiles, but that it would also add a seemingly long and sometimes stressful journey into the world of food allergies. 

Baby E was born last August happy and healthy.  He was welcomed home by mom, dad, and his two big brothers.   Almost right away Baby E started showing signs of possible reflux.  We had been down the reflux road before since big brother 2 had reflux when he was a baby.   So when Baby E started sounding like something out of Star Wars (think Darth Vader), I mentioned to his doctor that I was concerned his nasal congestion was being caused by reflux.  So, Baby E was put on reflux medicine and it seemed to help a little bit. 

Baby E Before

Baby E Before

Then came the eczema.   Baby E was like a snake (but way cuter).  He started shedding away his soft newborn baby skin, and angry red baby acne took its place.  The doctor said it was completely normal and likely caused by hormones.  It was at this point that I started to consider the possibility that Baby E may be reacting to something in my diet.  Refluxand terrible skin?  But, I shrugged it off.

Then came the mucous-filled diapers.  I knew from having been down the breast-feeding diaper route before, mucous is an uninvited guest.  Seeds, yes.  Mucous, no.  He also had terrible tummy aches and painful gas.  He would often cry and had a hard time settling down.   Gas relief drops didn’t seem to help.

Then came the blood and green poops.  There is really no way to shrug off lime green bowel movements with streaks of visible blood throughout.  I immediately took Baby E back to the doctor where they took a stool sample and made sure Baby E didn’t have an infection.   No infection.  And so our journey began.  

 I knew I wanted to continue breastfeeding Baby E, so at the doctor’s recommendation I cut dairy out of my diet immediately.  Baby E seemed to make slow improvement after only a few days.   We then eliminated soy as well.  After almost two weeks of being dairy and soy free, Baby E had “better” diapers but not normal. 

This is where TED entered my life.   Total Elimination Diet

Unfortunately, my doctor was not able to offer much advice or information about TED, so I found most of my information from infantreflux.org and kellymom.com.  Determined to get kick mucous out of this diaper party and to continue to breast-feed my “intolerant” child, I started eating nothing but chicken, turkey, rice, potatoes, apples, and bananas.  Being on such a restrictive diet allowed me rid Baby E of mucous diapers, reflux, and his eczema.  Then I slowly added foods back into my diet and waited for a reaction. This was how I was able to determine that Baby E cannot tolerate dairy, soy, eggs, and tomatoes.  So now, I am still breastfeeding but avoiding these foods in my diet, and Baby E is doing great!   

Baby E After

Our journey is still continuing.  Since starting solid foods Baby E has had reactions to pears and infant oatmeal cereal.  In spite of this, I feel lucky and blessed that Baby E is doing so well and that I am able to continue breastfeeding him. 

-Rachel Miller


Benjamin is Happy and Healthy Thanks to Neocate

Posted 10.24.11 | Nutrition Specialist

As a newborn boy Benjamin weighed a healthy 6 lbs. 3 oz. but within days of his birth, he began to lose weight and break out in a rash all over his body.  He was terribly unhappy and inconsolable. 

While Benjamin struggled to gain weight, he began to vomit every time he ate and often had diarrhea.  At two and half weeks old, Benjamin’s parents took him to the emergency room where he was admitted for one month.  As his symptoms worsened, doctors ran numerous tests, all of which came back inconclusive.  They also tried many different formulas but nothing relieved Benjamin’s symptoms.

“Benjamin was born a healthy child and it was so hard to watch him slowly lose weight and have his symptoms continually become worse,” says Suzanne Berkovitz, Benjamin’s mother.    

After a few weeks in the hospital, Benjamin was put on 10 days of bowel rest and antibiotics.  Eventually doctors concluded that Benjamin had a severe milk protein allergy in addition to a soy allergy.  

Neocate was slowly introduced into Benjamin’s system after his dramatic weight loss and numerous setbacks at the hospital.  Benjamin’s symptoms began to improve just a few days after starting Neocate and he was discharged from the hospital once he began to gain weight.  

“After everything Benjamin had been through, I was doubtful that anything could make him better but I noticed a difference in him almost immediately after starting Neocate,” says Suzanne. 

At 15 weeks old, Benjamin weighs 15 pounds on his Neocate diet.  His rash has disappeared and all of his symptoms have dissipated.

“Benjamin is a happy, healthy baby now.  He loves to eat and we owe his success to Neocate!” says Suzanne.  

  

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Natural Skin Soothers for Eczema

Posted 8.2.12 | Nutrition Specialist

If you are using Neocate with your little one, you may be familiar with eczema, an uncomfortably itchy rash often associated with food allergies.  Fortunately, if your child’s eczema is related to a food allergy transitioning your little one to Neocate helps address the root cause of the problem by providing a hypoallergenic source of nutrition.

However, for some children it can still take some time after starting Neocate for eczema to completely resolve and in the interim you may have a very unhappy baby on your hands. Also, for some children eczema can flair from environmental triggers. What to do? Mother Nature has a few tricks up her sleeve that can help bring relief to your little one (and you!):

  1. Oatmeal Bath:Oatmeal has skin softening properties to soothe and moisturize irritated skin. To make the bath, fill a sock with oatmeal (use gluten free oats if your child is sensitive to gluten), and place the sock over the faucet so the water run through the oatmeal, creating a milky oat bath to relax in. For an even easier bath, purchase colloidal oatmeal powder to add to bath water. Oatmeal baths are also wonderful for dry winter skin. 
  2. Chamomile Tea Bath: Chamomile flowers have anti inflammatory properties that can help relieve skin irritations. To make the bath, brew a strong cup of chamomile tea and add to bath water. However, if your child has seasonal allergies chamomile may not be suitable because it is a member of the ragweed family and may cause a reaction.
  3. Cucumber Compress: Have your little one be cool as a cucumber with this naturally soothing veggie! If eczema is isolated to a small area, place sliced or shredded cucumber onto the affected area to help cool the skin and relieve itching.
  4. Calendula Cream:Calendula is another flower that has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties and has traditionally been used to treat skin irritations. Calendula creams can be found at most natural food stores.

As always, discuss home remedies with your health care provider to ensure that it is appropriate for your unique child.

Do you have your own home remedy for soothing eczema? We would love to hear about it!

-Irene

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About Us

Food Allergy Living is a resource for parents of children with food allergies, brought to you by Nutricia, the makers of Neocate. For more in-depth information about our purpose & authors, see our About Food Allergy Living page.