Food Allergy Living Blog Tagged Results


CMA

World Allergy Organization: Cow’s Milk Allergy Guidelines

Posted 3.24.11 | Christine Graham-Garo

A few weeks ago I had posted some highlights from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) guidelines on food allergies that came out in December 2010.

Today I wanted to share the World Allergy Organization’s (WAO) guidelines on cow’s milk allergy (CMA). WAO is a leading source of allergy information worldwide for medical professionals and consumers. The WAO Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow’s Milk Allergy (DRACMA) Guidelines were released in April 2010. They are open to the public, which is great. Feel free to review them by following the link.

They may be best to share with your allergist, pediatric gastroenterologist, dietitian, or general pediatrician if your little one has been diagnosed with or is thought to have CMA.

Keep in mind it is a large document (~100 pages...whoa!).It really does a great job at providing recommendations on the proper diagnostic tools needed for an accurate CMA diagnosis (as 50 - 90% of food allergy diagnoses are not actually food allergies). The WAO also provides information on amino acid-based formulas (AABF), such as Neocate, and where the use of AAB products is best in the management plan of patients (e.g. Eosinophilic Esophagitis patients).

Hopefully this will help you and your child’s doctor in understanding the proper guidelines in accurately diagnosing and managing your child’s CMA. Let us know what you think of it. Is this useful information for you or your child’s doctor?

Christine


A Mother’s Journey – A new website to help parents

Posted 12.31.13 | Rob McCandlish, RDN


For years our team of Nutrition Specialists has helped concerned and confused parents to understand how Neocate can help children with food allergies or a cow milk allergy (CMA). Parents who are new to food allergies often struggle in the beginning and follow a long journey to answers. We wanted to help these families by providing a new resource where they are likely to look for answers.


A new website

These days many parents use the internet to research medical questions before asking their doctor, and conversations with doctors are difficult for some parents. We at Neocate created a new site to help parents have meaningful discussions with the healthcare team when their little one shows food allergy symptoms – AMothersJourney.com. We included tools to help parents such as an emotional video about one mother's journey with food allergies and a Symptom Checklist, which lists possible symptoms of CMA. We also included a Food Allergy Discussion Guide, since healthcare teams depend on information from the family in order to diagnose and manage allergies. We hope the Discussion Guide will help parents provide useful information and ask the right questions.


Who should visit the new site?

This new website was designed for families looking for answers. For instance: parents of children that may be experiencing food allergy-related symptoms who need to speak with the doctor to get more information. It can also help families with a little one newly diagnosed with a food allergy, still searching for the right formula or diet to help manage food allergy symptoms.

As a parent who has been through this journey and found the answers that your child needed, we ask that you take a look at our new site and share it with other parents who might need help. Share this link: www.amothersjourney.com


What do you think of the new site? Would a site like A Mother’s Journey have helped you when you were looking for answers?

- Rob

Image source


Do You Know the Signs? Understanding Cow Milk Allergy

Posted 3.23.15 | Nutrition Specialist

With the rise in food allergies among children, it is increasingly important for parents and caregivers to recognize the signs and symptoms of food allergies. Among foods that are common allergens, cow milk allergy (CMA) remains the most prevalent in infants and children. 

In the following video, "8 Signs of a Cow Milk Allergy," our nutrition specialists Rob, RDN and Mallory break down eight of the most common signs of CMA, which were provided by a pediatric allergist.

 

Click the image below for the video:

 

 

For more information on cow milk allergy, check out the following resources:


Cow Milk Allergy – It’s More Than Just Blood in Stool

Posted 6.14.16 | Nutrition Specialist

According to Food Allergy Research & Education, Inc (FARE), approximately 2.5% of children younger than 3 years of age are allergic to cow milk. Most of these infants and children will outgrow their cow milk allergy, while some may not.

How Do I Know if My Child is Allergic to Cow Milk?

Blood in a child’s stool can be a sign of an allergy to cow milk, and it's one that you may have heard about, or that your healthcare team may have shared with you. But what are some other signs that your child might be allergic to cow milk?

The following infographic highlights eight common signs and symptoms of a cow milk allergy (CMA), while also providing tips on what parents should look for and next steps if children are exhibiting signs of CMA.

Difference Between Lactose Intolerance and Milk Allergy

Now that we've reviewed common CMA signs and symptoms, you might be wondering, What is the difference between CMA and lactose intolerance? The following video from Dr. Adam Fox helps to explain the difference:

Dr. Adam Fox

Common Signs and symptoms of a Cow Milk Allergy

These signs or symptoms may take anywhere from minutes to hours to days until they appear.

  • Skin Rash/Itchy Skin/Hives
  • Vomiting
  • Extreme fussiness
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive Gas
  • Wheezing, coughing or other respiratory symptoms

Now, let’s talk about each of these signs in further detail.

Skin Rash/Itchy Skin/Hives

There are many causes of rashes in infants and children. Some are viral, others are due to something in the environment, but some may be due to the food that your child is consuming if he or she has an allergy. If hives develop right after your child has consumed food, it may warrant further investigation into food allergies. The skin around the mouth may be especially itchy if your child has certain food allergies. Note where the rash is and if it seems to bother your child. Remember that old saying, “A picture is worth 1,000 words”. If a rash appears on your child, don’t forget to take a picture and show it to your doctor. If you would like to keep a diary of all the symptoms your child is exhibiting and what she consumed, make sure to check-out the Neocate Footsteps App.

Vomiting

Some babies spit-up after eating if they eat too much, too quickly or a combination of both. They may also vomit due to an illness. By keeping track of your child’s vomiting, it may help to determine if cow milk is the cause of her vomiting.

Extreme Fussiness

The definition of colic applies to healthy, well-fed infants who cry more than 3 hours a day, more than 3 days a week, for more than 3 weeks. Even though these criteria exist, colic is not well defined. The crying and fussiness that we call colic could mean that they are experiencing extreme abdominal pain, and cow milk may be the cause. Investigate extreme fussiness with your pediatrician to determine if there is a change in your child’s diet that may help.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea (and other gastrointestinal symptoms) may be due to the foods your child eats or to an illness. It is important to note when the diarrhea starts and how long it lasts. If diarrhea continues more than 2-4 times per day for more than 5-7 days, it may be a sign of a cow milk allergy. It is also important to note if there is mucus and/or blood in the stool, as these can also indicate a cow milk allergy.

Excessive Gas

Babies can be gassy as their gastrointestinal tracts get used to foods they are consuming. If your child seems excessively gassy and it has a foul odor, it may be a sign of a cow milk allergy, especially when it is in combination with some of these other symptoms.

Wheezing, coughing or other respiratory symptoms

Respiratory symptoms may be a more serious sign of a cow milk allergy and should be taken seriously if you suspect your child has more than a cold. These include wheezing and coughing. If your child starts wheezing or has other respiratory problems after consuming cow milk-containing foods, seek medical attention. More severe than other respiratory symptoms is anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

It is best to talk with your healthcare provider if you suspect a food allergy, and keep track of the symptoms with a food diary to help determine what the food allergen may be. The Neocate® Footsteps App can help you keep track of some of these symptoms and allows you to take pictures, if need be, of any skin rashes or other reactions.

Management of a Cow Milk Allergy

If your child is allergic to cow milk, your doctor may recommend a hypoallergenic formula like Neocate to help meet your child’s nutritional needs. Neocate products are available for children of all ages for the dietary management of a cow milk allergy. Just like you'd expect, Neocate is dairy-free! Learn more about available Neocate products.

Can You Outgrow a Milk Allergy?

Most infants and children eventually outgrow a cow milk allergy. However there is no specific age by which this will happen. Each child is unique. Over the years, research has shown that most children will outgrow a cow milk allergy within a few years. For more severe cow milk allergies, research has shown it can take longer. For example, some researchers found that 80% of chidlren they followed with CMA outgrew their allergy by 16 years of age. Read more.

These are just some of the signs and symptoms of a cow milk allergy with a couple frequently asked questions we encounter. When it comes to cow milk allergy, what other questions do you have that we can address in our future posts?

-Ellen


Will My Child Outgrow Their Cow Milk Allergy?

Posted 5.24.17 | Christine Graham-Garo


When children are diagnosed with milk allergies, parents might wonder, “Will my baby grow out of it?” As much as your new hypoallergenic formula and allergen-friendly diet is helping, you can’t help but wonder when you can feed your child without anxiety. Keep in mind, it’s normal to wonder!

Good news – Many children do outgrow their allergies; however, it may depend on what the child is allergic to and the type of allergy they have. Most importantly, keep in mind that all children are different!

Children with cow milk allergy (CMA) may be more likely to outgrow their allergies than their peanut or tree nut allergy buddies. One research study showed that 80% of kids diagnosed with a CMA will outgrow their allergy by 16 years of age[1]. More specifically, other research studies have found that about 45-50% of children outgrow CMA at one year, 60-75% at two years and 85-90% at three years.[2],[3]

Fortunately, the general consensus is that around 80% of children with cow milk allergy will outgrow it by 3-5 years of age[5]. Regular follow up by your medical specialist is important to re-test tolerance of cow milk protein.[6]

Now, compare that to the studies which show that about 20% and 10%, respectively, of young patients may outgrow peanut and tree nut allergies and approximately 8% of patients who outgrow a peanut allergy will later relapse, meaning the allergy comes back. Additionally, nut-related allergies are typically more severe and more likely to be fatal, which is quite scary![3]

For example, if your little one has multiple food allergies, such as both CMA and tree nut allergies, he or she may outgrow the CMA while the tree nut allergy could still persist. Still, outgrowing an allergy to cow milk will expand their diet and improve the quality of life and available foods for your little one.

Now this may be “good news/bad news” for some families. The good news is that the chance of the cow milk allergy being outgrown is very good, even if the child has the allergy into their teenage years, they are still likely to outgrow it. The bad news is that some infants with CMA may have it into their early teenage years, and a handful may never outgrow it.

The other factor that may influence your little one’s chances of outgrowing a food allergy is the levels of allergen-specific IgE detected in their blood. This means, the lower the allergen-specific IgE detected, the greater the chance of outgrowing the allergy. Your doctor can monitor this - make sure to ask them to explain the results, show you have the level has changed over time, and explain what the possible implications are.

As mentioned before, all children are different. Your little one may have all the right “ingredients” to overcome their cow milk allergy, but there is no way to know exactly when he or she will outgrow it. Your doctor may decide to attempt a food trial by introducing some foods that your child is allergic to, in order to see if the allergy still persists. Be patient, sometimes food trials can be taxing.

Our advice to allergy parents is not to worry, there is usually a light at the end of the tunnel! It’s wonderful if a child can outgrow their cow milk allergy, but if not, they can still thrive and lead happy, healthy lives.

To the more experienced food allergy parents, can you shed any advice on food trials and outgrowing allergies? Comment below or share your thoughts with us on our Facebook page!


[1] Skripack et al, J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007

[2] de Boissieu D, Dupont C. Time course of allergy to extensively hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins in infants. J Pediatr 2000;136:119-20.

[3] de Boissieu D, Dupont C. Allergy to extensively hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins in infants: safety and duration of amino acid-based formula. : J Pediatr. 2002;141:271-3.

[4] The natural history of peanut and tree nut allergy. Fleischer DM. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2007 Jun;7(3):175-81. Review.

[5] March 2016.  Cow’s milk (dairy) allergy, Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, [http://www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy/cows-milk-dairy-allergy] Viewed 6 May 2016

[6] Motala & Fiocchi, 2012, Cow’s milk allergy in children, World Allergy Organisation, [http://www.worldallergy.org/professional/allergic_diseases_center/cows_milk_allergy_in_children/] Viewed 15 May 2016



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Food Allergy Living is a resource for parents of children with food allergies, brought to you by Nutricia, the makers of Neocate. For more in-depth information about our purpose & authors, see our About Food Allergy Living page.