Food Allergy Living Blog

Signs and Symptoms of a Milk Allergy

Baby Rashes from A to Z (Acne to Eczema!) and When Is It a Milk Allergy?

Posted 4.18.17 | Nutrition Specialist

What new parent hasn’t asked questions like this: “Where did THAT come from?” Or maybe “Why is she suddenly so ITCHY?” Or even “What ARE all of those little bumps on her head?”

Babies drink what we give them (unless they don’t like it!), wear what we put on them (until they take it off!), and tend to stay where we put them (until they go mobile!). If adults are in control and a baby never leaves our sight, we should have answers to these questions. But almost every new parent comes up against a skin condition that they can’t explain.

As newborn babies grow and develop they can experience lots of different skin conditions. Some are typical, whereas others can be hard to explain. In today’s post, we’re going to walk through some of the most common questions and answers related to baby rashes. Food allergies can play a role in some of these conditions, so we’ll point out where that’s the case. 

Acne

Acne is something we associate with teenagers, but it can happen anytime in life. Acne is usually related to hormones, and babies sure do have hormones! Where do babies get hormones, maternal hormones are passed through the womb. Baby acne is harmless and usually goes away within a few weeks.

According to MayoClinic, “Baby acne can occur anywhere on the face, but usually appears on the cheeks, nose and forehead. Baby acne is common — and temporary. There's little you can do to prevent baby acne. Baby acne usually clears up on its own, without scarring.” Read more to learn when to see a doctor about baby acne

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis – which may also be called atopic eczema, involves scaly and itchy rashes that can be over a small or large part of the body. It can be triggered by allergens in the air (pollen, mold, dust mites, or animals), dry skin, or any number of factors. Severity of symptoms varies from one person to another. There’s an association between atopic dermatitis and food allergies, especially in cases of severe atopic dermatitis. At this time, it’s not clear if one causes the other. For infants, atopic dermatitis and cow milk allergy often are linked.

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis describes a situation where some substance makes contact with the skin and causes it to become red or inflamed. This could be anything from food to laundry detergent or lotions. Your little one’s healthcare team can help you narrow down the possibilities and make changes to remove whatever’s causing this type of dermatitis. If food is a cause, you’ll need to keep your little one from coming into contact with the food and cosmetics with ingredients from that food. Symptoms and treatments of contact dermatitis.

Diaper Rash

Diaper rash happens when a rash occurs on parts of the skin in contact with diapers. Some causes include having wet diapers on for too long, when the infant has diarrhea, or diapers are too tight. Rash can also be caused by introduction of new products to clean, for example if you are using cloth diapers. Symptoms and treatments of diaper rash.

Eczema

Eczema is a generic term for any dermatitis or skin swelling or itching. It’s often used to describe atopic dermatitis – see above! Read over a story of Morgan and his food allergy related eczema.

Hives

Hives, also called urticarial, are red, itchy bumps on the skin, often caused by an allergic reaction to a food or a drug. Hives can vary in size and can at times connect with one another to create a larger swelling. They often go away within 24 hours, but are still no fun. It’s important to avoid whatever substance or food triggers hives. Symptoms and treatments of hives.

Rash

A rash is a generic term that describes some sort of itchiness or irritation of the skin. Your doctor would be the best resource to look and narrow down what a rash represents and what might be causing it. For little onces, their pediatrician may decide to refer you to an allergist and/or a dermatologist.

When is a Rash a Milk Allergy?

Baby Rash

You should always refer to your pediatrician to help you understand what is causing your little one’s rash, but it’s also important to look at the big picture. Sometimes a baby with a cow milk allergy will also display other symptoms in addition to the rash. For instance, you may also see symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, gassiness, wheezing, runny nose, and/or colic.

If you do see a rash accompanied by any of these other symptoms, make sure to keep detailed notes and share all symptoms with your little one's doctor so that the healthcare team has all of the information to get to the bottom of what might be happening.

Also, make sure to work with your pediatrician to come up with a plan for taking care of your baby’s skin – no matter what is triggering the rash, it is important to take possible steps to alleviate the rash and any discomfort. Some possible steps your little one's doctor might suggest include:

  • Bathing your baby in soothing lukewarm water
  • Avoiding scented soaps, bath oils, and perfumed powders
  • Applying an over-the-counter moisturizer to your baby’s skin
  • Keeping your baby’s fingernails filed short and smooth to minimize damage from scratching
     
  • Using cotton mittens to help prevent scratching
  • Dressing your baby in soft cotton fabrics to prevent possible fabric irritation
  • Keeping your baby cool and avoiding hot, humid environments
  • Trying to keep your baby distracted from the itchiness with fun activities

We’ve told you what we know about various common skin conditions that you might see on your little one. Keep in mind, there are other conditions that can cause skin rashes, including various infections. Even with this info, you probably still have questions and want answers! The next step is to discuss them further with you little one’s healthcare team. Make sure you plan ahead, take notes and ask the right questions when you see your doctor.

-Rob

Rob McCandlish is a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who joined the Nutricia team in 2010. Rob has years of experience at Nutricia following food allergy research, working with Neocate products, talking with Neocate families and learning about the science behind Neocate and food allergies. Rob has two nephews who both used Neocate for their cow milk allergies!


Cow Milk Allergy – It’s More Than Just Blood in Stool

Posted 6.14.16 | Nutrition Specialist

According to Food Allergy Research & Education, Inc (FARE), approximately 2.5% of children younger than 3 years of age are allergic to cow milk. Most of these infants and children will outgrow their cow milk allergy, while some may not.

How Do I Know if My Child is Allergic to Cow Milk?

Blood in a child’s stool can be a sign of an allergy to cow milk, and it's one that you may have heard about, or that your healthcare team may have shared with you. But what are some other signs that your child might be allergic to cow milk?

The following infographic highlights eight common signs and symptoms of a cow milk allergy (CMA), while also providing tips on what parents should look for and next steps if children are exhibiting signs of CMA.

Difference Between Lactose Intolerance and Milk Allergy

Now that we've reviewed common CMA signs and symptoms, you might be wondering, What is the difference between CMA and lactose intolerance? The following video from Dr. Adam Fox helps to explain the difference:

Dr. Adam Fox

Common Signs and symptoms of a Cow Milk Allergy

These signs or symptoms may take anywhere from minutes to hours to days until they appear.

  • Skin Rash/Itchy Skin/Hives
  • Vomiting
  • Extreme fussiness
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive Gas
  • Wheezing, coughing or other respiratory symptoms

Now, let’s talk about each of these signs in further detail.

Skin Rash/Itchy Skin/Hives

There are many causes of rashes in infants and children. Some are viral, others are due to something in the environment, but some may be due to the food that your child is consuming if he or she has an allergy. If hives develop right after your child has consumed food, it may warrant further investigation into food allergies. The skin around the mouth may be especially itchy if your child has certain food allergies. Note where the rash is and if it seems to bother your child. Remember that old saying, “A picture is worth 1,000 words”. If a rash appears on your child, don’t forget to take a picture and show it to your doctor. If you would like to keep a diary of all the symptoms your child is exhibiting and what she consumed, make sure to check-out the Neocate Footsteps App.

Vomiting

Some babies spit-up after eating if they eat too much, too quickly or a combination of both. They may also vomit due to an illness. By keeping track of your child’s vomiting, it may help to determine if cow milk is the cause of her vomiting.

Extreme Fussiness

The definition of colic applies to healthy, well-fed infants who cry more than 3 hours a day, more than 3 days a week, for more than 3 weeks. Even though these criteria exist, colic is not well defined. The crying and fussiness that we call colic could mean that they are experiencing extreme abdominal pain, and cow milk may be the cause. Investigate extreme fussiness with your pediatrician to determine if there is a change in your child’s diet that may help.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea (and other gastrointestinal symptoms) may be due to the foods your child eats or to an illness. It is important to note when the diarrhea starts and how long it lasts. If diarrhea continues more than 2-4 times per day for more than 5-7 days, it may be a sign of a cow milk allergy. It is also important to note if there is mucus and/or blood in the stool, as these can also indicate a cow milk allergy.

Excessive Gas

Babies can be gassy as their gastrointestinal tracts get used to foods they are consuming. If your child seems excessively gassy and it has a foul odor, it may be a sign of a cow milk allergy, especially when it is in combination with some of these other symptoms.

Wheezing, coughing or other respiratory symptoms

Respiratory symptoms may be a more serious sign of a cow milk allergy and should be taken seriously if you suspect your child has more than a cold. These include wheezing and coughing. If your child starts wheezing or has other respiratory problems after consuming cow milk-containing foods, seek medical attention. More severe than other respiratory symptoms is anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

It is best to talk with your healthcare provider if you suspect a food allergy, and keep track of the symptoms with a food diary to help determine what the food allergen may be. The Neocate® Footsteps App can help you keep track of some of these symptoms and allows you to take pictures, if need be, of any skin rashes or other reactions.

Management of a Cow Milk Allergy

If your child is allergic to cow milk, your doctor may recommend a hypoallergenic formula like Neocate to help meet your child’s nutritional needs. Neocate products are available for children of all ages for the dietary management of a cow milk allergy. Just like you'd expect, Neocate is dairy-free! Learn more about available Neocate products.

Can You Outgrow a Milk Allergy?

Most infants and children eventually outgrow a cow milk allergy. However there is no specific age by which this will happen. Each child is unique. Over the years, research has shown that most children will outgrow a cow milk allergy within a few years. For more severe cow milk allergies, research has shown it can take longer. For example, some researchers found that 80% of chidlren they followed with CMA outgrew their allergy by 16 years of age. Read more.

These are just some of the signs and symptoms of a cow milk allergy with a couple frequently asked questions we encounter. When it comes to cow milk allergy, what other questions do you have that we can address in our future posts?

-Ellen


Common Signs of Cow Milk Allergy (1 of 4)

Posted 10.13.15 | Nutrition Specialist


When a healthcare team recommends an amino acid-based infant formula like Neocate Infant DHA/ARA, it's often based on a suspicion of cow milk allergy (CMA). The best way for a healthcare team to confirm that an infant has CMA is to 1) remove cow milk from the diet, and 2) re-introduce cow milk in a healthcare setting under a doctor's supervision. If suspected symptoms of CMA improve when cow milk is removed from the diet then reappear when cow milk is reintroduced, CMA is likely to be officially diagnosed.

But many new parents dealing with unexpected symptoms in their little one wonder: What are some of the most common signs and symptoms of CMA among infants? This video outlines 8 of the most common signs and symptoms that a heatlhcare team is likely to keep an eye out for, or that may lead them to suspect CMA. It comes from a Board-certified pediatric allergist. However, it's certainly not a comprehensive list - some signs and symptoms are less common.

Also, not every infant with one or more of these symptoms will be diagnosed with CMA. Finally, every infant who develops an allergy to cow milk will have a slightly different experience with different signs and symptoms - no two babies with CMA are the same! Here's a bit more information on two of those symptoms.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea can be very concerning to someone caring for an infant. It's not unusual for every infant to have a loose stool every now and then, but multiple loose or liquid stools a day may be a sign of something unusual. For infants who experience diarrhea as a result of CMA may also have blood in the stool. It's important to remember that diarrhea has many causes, so the best thing to do is to check with the healthcare team if you are concerned that your little one is experiencing diarrhea. Read more about diarrhea and it's association with a cow milk allergy.

Vomiting

It's normal for every infant to spit up at some point, but some infants spit up more than others. Many infants who spit up but don't seem bothered by it are termed "happy spitters." For some infants though, spitting up may represent something more concerning such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or vomitting. In these cases, the reflux of vomitting may be related to cow milk allergy. In those cases, taking cow milk out of the diet should help resolve the reflux or vomitting. Read more information on reflux and vomitting in infancy.

As always, consult your heatlhcare team if you are concerned that your little one is showing signs or symptoms of a cow milk allergy.

-Rob

Part 2 of 4 - Skin rashes, Extreme fussiness
Part 3 of 4 - Slow weight gan, Gas (Flatulence)
Part 4 of 4 - Respiratory symptoms, Failure to thrive


Natural Skin Soothers for Eczema

Posted 8.2.12 | Nutrition Specialist

If you are using Neocate with your little one, you may be familiar with eczema, an uncomfortably itchy rash often associated with food allergies.  Fortunately, if your child’s eczema is related to a food allergy transitioning your little one to Neocate helps address the root cause of the problem by providing a hypoallergenic source of nutrition.

However, for some children it can still take some time after starting Neocate for eczema to completely resolve and in the interim you may have a very unhappy baby on your hands. Also, for some children eczema can flair from environmental triggers. What to do? Mother Nature has a few tricks up her sleeve that can help bring relief to your little one (and you!):

  1. Oatmeal Bath:Oatmeal has skin softening properties to soothe and moisturize irritated skin. To make the bath, fill a sock with oatmeal (use gluten free oats if your child is sensitive to gluten), and place the sock over the faucet so the water run through the oatmeal, creating a milky oat bath to relax in. For an even easier bath, purchase colloidal oatmeal powder to add to bath water. Oatmeal baths are also wonderful for dry winter skin. 
  2. Chamomile Tea Bath: Chamomile flowers have anti inflammatory properties that can help relieve skin irritations. To make the bath, brew a strong cup of chamomile tea and add to bath water. However, if your child has seasonal allergies chamomile may not be suitable because it is a member of the ragweed family and may cause a reaction.
  3. Cucumber Compress: Have your little one be cool as a cucumber with this naturally soothing veggie! If eczema is isolated to a small area, place sliced or shredded cucumber onto the affected area to help cool the skin and relieve itching.
  4. Calendula Cream:Calendula is another flower that has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties and has traditionally been used to treat skin irritations. Calendula creams can be found at most natural food stores.

As always, discuss home remedies with your health care provider to ensure that it is appropriate for your unique child.

Do you have your own home remedy for soothing eczema? We would love to hear about it!

-Irene

[IMAGE SOURCE]


Ryder’s Story

Posted 6.19.12 | Sarah O'Brien

If you have been reading our blog for the past few years, you may know that I not only have been working for Neocate for over 11 years but I’ve also had firsthand experience with cow milk allergy (CMA) and Neocate.   My daughter was recommended to take Neocate when she was just seven weeks old for what doctors and I believe was a cow milk allergy.  Once we started Neocate her reflux and colic symptoms resolved within a few weeks and all went according to expectations.  So, when her brother, Ryder, came and didn’t spit up the day he was born as she did I was hopeful!  Unfortunately, his reflux symptoms started soon after he was born but seemed to be controlled with Zantac. 

At around five weeks old my poor little guy became feverish.  We were advised to take him to the emergency room which turned into four long, exhausting days in the hospital.  Multiple doctors came to see us trying to determine the cause of the fever.  We had test-after-test-after-test done with no answers and a fever that just wouldn’t resolve.   By process of elimination it was determined that he simply had a virus that he had to fight through.  However, through test results, a GI doctor believed that his virus was possibly causing his liver to malfunction.  The GI doctor told us he needed a formula that was elemental and easy to break down so the liver didn’t have to work as hard.  I couldn’t believe it; my second baby needed Neocate too.  Per the GI doctor we started Neocate immediately.  After four days, his fever finally resolved and liver levels were moving in the right direction so we headed home.

Two days after starting Neocate (with no transition period) I decided to switch him back to standard formula since I believed the virus really was the cause of the liver malfunction.  About two weeks later we had a follow-up visit with the GI doctor who told us that his liver was back to normal – phew!  However, as timing is everything, he happened to have a bowel movement at the doctor’s office.  To my BIG surprise the doctor found blood in the stool.  Back to Neocate we go!

This time I went by the book and slowly transitioned him onto the Neocate.  Again, two days into it and things were not going well.  I had a fussy baby who didn’t sleep and wouldn’t eat.  I knew in my heart that I needed to stick with the Neocate and things would get better as I tell parents like you that every day.  But, at that point my internal voice was screaming and I wanted to switch him back!  I was desperate to get my happy little boy back. 

It took every ounce of me and a lot of family/friend support to keep him on the Neocate.  After what seemed to be a year-long week, things started to turn around and after about two weeks I was so thankful for sticking with the Neocate.  He was drinking more than ever, was happy as could be and all the blood in the stool had cleared up!  He is now about to turn one and continues to do so great!  I would have never imagined that I would end up with two happy Neocate babies!

-Sarah


Neocate Vanilla Orange Pineapple Fruit Blast

Posted 6.17.12 | Nutrition Specialist

Looking to make a new refreshing drink?  Try out this recipe using Neocate Junior with Prebiotics, Vanilla and tell us what you think!

Ingredients:

Instructions:

Crush ice and frozen pineapple in blender first.  Then add Neocate Junior with Prebiotics, Vanilla.  Blend for a few seconds.  Add orange juice, pineapple juice and CAAM (if approved by a healthcare professional).  Blend till evenly mixed. Pour in glass and serve. Add a pineapple slide as a garnish.

 Nutrition Information per serving:

Calories:                      334     

Protein, g:                   8.2g (16g with Complete Amino Acid Mix)   

Carbohydrates:           49 g    

Fat:                              8g

Fiber:                           2g

 Serving Size ~12 fl oz           

Neocate Junior with Prebiotics, Vanilla is an aspartame-free, hypoallergenic and nutritionally complete medical food for children over the age of one.  And as a reminder, be sure to consult your healthcare professional to determine if this recipe, ingredients and consistencies are appropriate for your child.

*We have an optional addition which is our Complete Amino Acid Mix, as this can help to add a few more grams of protein (in the form of amino acids) to your child’s diet.  Please note: you must speak to your child’s healthcare professional before adding this to the recipe to ensure it is needed or appropriate for your child.  Younger children may not need this level of protein. The added protein may be appropriate for an older child (13 years +). 

 


Video: Common Symptoms of a Cow’s Milk Allergy

Posted 6.21.11 | Nutrition Specialist

Hi everyone!

We hear from many moms (and dads!) out there who are looking for a list of common symptoms to help them identify a potential cow milk allergy.  This is why we decided to create a video about the Common Symptoms of a Cow Milk Allergy  for our NeocateUS YouTube channel

Also, if you enjoy receiving information from Neocate this way (via video) please let us know by posting a comment on our YouTube channel.  We are continuing to work on more videos and we would love to hear from you!

 

So, what kind of other videos would you like to see on our channel?

 

-Sarah 


A Mom’s Journey with TED (Total Elimination Diet)

Posted 6.7.11 | Nutrition Specialist

Our post today is a guest blog entry from Rachel Miller, Baby E’s mom. We’d like to thank Rachel for guest blogging for us.

Never could I have imagined that adding another bouncing baby boy to our family last summer would not only add extra snuggles and smiles, but that it would also add a seemingly long and sometimes stressful journey into the world of food allergies. 

Baby E was born last August happy and healthy.  He was welcomed home by mom, dad, and his two big brothers.   Almost right away Baby E started showing signs of possible reflux.  We had been down the reflux road before since big brother 2 had reflux when he was a baby.   So when Baby E started sounding like something out of Star Wars (think Darth Vader), I mentioned to his doctor that I was concerned his nasal congestion was being caused by reflux.  So, Baby E was put on reflux medicine and it seemed to help a little bit. 

Baby E Before

Baby E Before

Then came the eczema.   Baby E was like a snake (but way cuter).  He started shedding away his soft newborn baby skin, and angry red baby acne took its place.  The doctor said it was completely normal and likely caused by hormones.  It was at this point that I started to consider the possibility that Baby E may be reacting to something in my diet.  Refluxand terrible skin?  But, I shrugged it off.

Then came the mucous-filled diapers.  I knew from having been down the breast-feeding diaper route before, mucous is an uninvited guest.  Seeds, yes.  Mucous, no.  He also had terrible tummy aches and painful gas.  He would often cry and had a hard time settling down.   Gas relief drops didn’t seem to help.

Then came the blood and green poops.  There is really no way to shrug off lime green bowel movements with streaks of visible blood throughout.  I immediately took Baby E back to the doctor where they took a stool sample and made sure Baby E didn’t have an infection.   No infection.  And so our journey began.  

 I knew I wanted to continue breastfeeding Baby E, so at the doctor’s recommendation I cut dairy out of my diet immediately.  Baby E seemed to make slow improvement after only a few days.   We then eliminated soy as well.  After almost two weeks of being dairy and soy free, Baby E had “better” diapers but not normal. 

This is where TED entered my life.   Total Elimination Diet

Unfortunately, my doctor was not able to offer much advice or information about TED, so I found most of my information from infantreflux.org and kellymom.com.  Determined to get kick mucous out of this diaper party and to continue to breast-feed my “intolerant” child, I started eating nothing but chicken, turkey, rice, potatoes, apples, and bananas.  Being on such a restrictive diet allowed me rid Baby E of mucous diapers, reflux, and his eczema.  Then I slowly added foods back into my diet and waited for a reaction. This was how I was able to determine that Baby E cannot tolerate dairy, soy, eggs, and tomatoes.  So now, I am still breastfeeding but avoiding these foods in my diet, and Baby E is doing great!   

Baby E After

Our journey is still continuing.  Since starting solid foods Baby E has had reactions to pears and infant oatmeal cereal.  In spite of this, I feel lucky and blessed that Baby E is doing so well and that I am able to continue breastfeeding him. 

-Rachel Miller


All About Diarrhea

Posted 3.31.11 | Rob McCandlish, RDN

Here at Neocate, we get lots of questions about diapers. I mean lots! Many questions relate to constipation or diarrhea. We’ve posted about constipation in the past, but I thought it would be helpful to pull together our past comments on diarrhea, as well as provide some more medical information on the topic courtesy of the National Institutes of Health, or NIH.

Defining “Diarrhea”

Simply defined, diarrhea is loose, watery stools. It also means having these loose stools three or more times a day. There are more specific guidelines, but most people know diarrhea when they see it. Diarrhea happens to everyone, usually about once a year for adults and twice a year for young children.

Typically, diarrhea is acute, meaning that it lasts one or two days and then goes away. This type of diarrhea is typically caused by an infection. If diarrhea lasts more than two days, it can be something more serious. Diarrhea lasting more than two to four weeks – chronic diarrhea – may be a symptom of a chronic disease or condition.

The concern with diarrhea, especially when it lasts more than two days, is a risk of dehydration. Our bodies absorb most of the water and some minerals at the end of our digestive tract. When we have diarrhea we can’t absorb those things, leading to dehydration, which can be serious.

Diarrhea in Infants

New parents quickly become experts at several things, one of which is changing diapers. Since infants go through about eight diapers a day, parents easily pick up on anything abnormal. Every baby’s stools are different in terms of how watery they are, which makes defining diarrhea in infants difficult. To keep it simple, diarrhea is typically a sudden onset of frequent bowel movements that are more watery than usual.

The risk of dehydration from diarrhea is much higher in children than most adults, and especially in infants. Since infants can’t tell us what they’re feeling, it’s important to keep an eye out for signs of dehydration. With children and infants, you shouldn’t hesitate to call their healthcare provider if you have concerns. For infants under 4 months, the recommendation is that you contact the doctor at the first sign of diarrhea or dehydration.

Diarrhea and Food Allergies

Pulling this all together, diarrhea is one of the top signs of a food allergy, especially for infants. In infants with food allergies, diarrhea often lasts more than just a few days and may even be combined with other symptoms. It’s not uncommon to also see blood or mucus in the stool. Diarrhea can also result from lactose intolerance, which is not as severe as a food allergy, but which may also require a change in diet.

Like we hear from many Neocate parents, diarrhea is often one of the first signs to clear up after they start using Neocate. This is because Neocate doesn’t contain any lactose (or any dairy at all!) or whole proteins. These substances would normally cause a reaction in the body that leads to poor absorption and diarrhea. Infants are able to absorb the nutrients they need from Neocate without the bad reaction that often results in diarrhea. Most parents tell us that the switch to Neocate has meant more solid stools and many fewer diapers.

- Rob

[Image Source]


World Allergy Organization: Cow’s Milk Allergy Guidelines

Posted 3.24.11 | Christine Graham-Garo

A few weeks ago I had posted some highlights from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) guidelines on food allergies that came out in December 2010.

Today I wanted to share the World Allergy Organization’s (WAO) guidelines on cow’s milk allergy (CMA). WAO is a leading source of allergy information worldwide for medical professionals and consumers. The WAO Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow’s Milk Allergy (DRACMA) Guidelines were released in April 2010. They are open to the public, which is great. Feel free to review them by following the link.

They may be best to share with your allergist, pediatric gastroenterologist, dietitian, or general pediatrician if your little one has been diagnosed with or is thought to have CMA.

Keep in mind it is a large document (~100 pages...whoa!).It really does a great job at providing recommendations on the proper diagnostic tools needed for an accurate CMA diagnosis (as 50 - 90% of food allergy diagnoses are not actually food allergies). The WAO also provides information on amino acid-based formulas (AABF), such as Neocate, and where the use of AAB products is best in the management plan of patients (e.g. Eosinophilic Esophagitis patients).

Hopefully this will help you and your child’s doctor in understanding the proper guidelines in accurately diagnosing and managing your child’s CMA. Let us know what you think of it. Is this useful information for you or your child’s doctor?

Christine



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About Us

Food Allergy Living is a resource for parents of children with food allergies, brought to you by Nutricia, the makers of Neocate. For more in-depth information about our purpose & authors, see our About Food Allergy Living page.